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Author Topic: Most reliable/well made factory bolt action  (Read 12786 times)
BAMB
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« on: October 13, 2011, 10:26:09 PM »

Although, I have had no problem whatsoever with it, some recent posts have got me thinkin about the long term reliability of my Savage Scout. I have only had it for about 7 months and have already put over 700 rounds through it as I tend to shoot my weapons as frequently as possible and try stay extremely familiar and proficient with them.  

I know there are some "cheap" parts in the Savage 110 action since it was originally built to be an inexpensive hunting rifle rather than a high volume shooter.

Anyway, I am wondering what current production bolt action rifles you guys think have the most reliable, rugged, well built actions (preferabely one with a lefty option). I'm talkin about something in which you'd typically wear out a couple of barrels before experiencing any internal parts breakages, not necessarily the most accurate thing in the world. Just thinkin about what to make a scout out of if the Savage ever starts to fall apart.

I know there are a lot of them out there but, which one do you think is the absolute best?

 

« Last Edit: October 14, 2011, 04:30:32 AM by BAMB » Logged
Andy
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« Reply #1 on: October 14, 2011, 05:07:13 AM »

Bamb,

I have owned and shot a # of rifles over the years. I really like the Remington 700 action (yeah, I know, it's a push feed...yadda yadda yaddaa..,..)


BUT, when I ponder your post I think that the Savage could be the EASIEST rifle to rebarrel and work on (for normal guys). Quick to rebarrel, the guts are simple and available (ok, if you bother Savage for them...!).

Otherwise, I think that the Remington is nice.  I had a Tikka for a bit, it seemed promising as well.

Andy
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Rick R
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« Reply #2 on: October 14, 2011, 06:30:57 AM »

My vote would be for the M98 Mauser, but you want currently produced actions so the Winchester M70 or Ruger M77 in factory rifles.  Both are built tank tough and easy enough to work on.  My .416 Remington is built on a Montana action that combines features from the Winchester M70 and M98 Mauser.  Feeds empty brass from the magazine without a hitch, shoots 3/4" groups with 350gr bullets at 2,600fps.  So far I'm happy with it but it's only got about 300 rounds downrange so time will tell.

I've known several people who owned Savage rifles, never known anyone to break one.  Known for their accuracy and ability for users to change barrels.  If you like your Savage then enjoy it and don't worry about breaking it till you break it.  Then you'll have the chance to learn how to fix it. 
« Last Edit: October 14, 2011, 06:35:33 AM by Rick R » Logged
F224
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« Reply #3 on: October 14, 2011, 07:23:27 AM »

I have owned over fifty custom rifles and shot about six different NRA match rigs. For my money nothing beats the R93 and R8 Blaser's.

My gunsmith is still pissed at me for going Blaser, after I did, he has gone for building me two rifles a year to two in the last ten years. And they were gifts for other people...
« Last Edit: October 14, 2011, 10:14:51 PM by F224 » Logged

Captain Dave Funk
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« Reply #4 on: October 14, 2011, 02:46:43 PM »

The Blaser rifles have always interested me, but I've never seen one that I could touch (I've only seen them in photos, on TV  and on the internet).  Where can they be bought, and how much do they cost?  They strike me as an interesting piece of technology, but overly engineered and probably delicate.  Obviously that is only an impression because I've never shot or even held one, so I could be completely wrong.

I think the toughest rifle on the market nowadays is the Ruger Hawkeye.  They are a modernized Mauser action.  Almost all of them need a little fiddling with the stock bedding to make them shoot better, but once that is done, you have a fine hunting rifle that will outlive several people.  My Hawkeyes have reasonably good triggers that seem to get better as I use them.  I've always had good luck with Remington 700s too.  I honestly don't think there is anything to this stuff people are saying about Savages not being "high round count" rifles.  I think that is nonsense!  Yes, some of the parts are stamped.  I haven't worn any of them out.  I know people who use them for target rifles.  A target gun gets more use than any hunting rifle (and probably more than most battle rifles).  If they hold up to that amount of shooting, I don't think there is a thing to worry about.  If you're worried, buy two identical ones so you have a backup when the first dies.  If you wear out any parts, buy another part with a couple of backups. In all honesty, I think firearms are one thing where the manufacturers don't have a policy of planned obsolesence or premature self destruction so you are forced to buy another.  Instead the manufacturers are trying to convince people that deer are now more bullet proof and your .308 or 30-06 won't kill them any more, therefore you have to buy a .300 Winchester Short Magnum or a .300 Remington Ultra Magnum to get through the bullet proof hides the deer recently evolved. Roll Eyes  (The .300 Ultra mag is one of those calibers that personally irks me.  If you want to get me going, start a thread on that caliber!)
« Last Edit: October 14, 2011, 02:51:19 PM by Whelenshooter » Logged

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« Reply #5 on: October 14, 2011, 06:19:11 PM »

I think the biggest attribute of the Blaser is its module platform. Just think, if we could get cost down, we could probably build our own scout rifle just like you can build an AR.
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triggertime
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« Reply #6 on: October 14, 2011, 08:07:43 PM »

+1 on the Win. M70 (and copies)  and Ruger.  I haven't seen a CZ opened up lately,  but they would probably apply as well.

Stamped sheet metal and rivets do work, probably longer than I think,  but are just "cheezy" IMO.  The cost for real steel is not that much more. Of course,  that may change soon, if we continue the gradual slide.

Regards,
Mark 
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BAMB
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« Reply #7 on: October 14, 2011, 09:17:31 PM »

BUT, when I ponder your post I think that the Savage could be the EASIEST rifle to rebarrel and work on (for normal guys). Quick to rebarrel, the guts are simple and available (ok, if you bother Savage for them...!).
I've known several people who owned Savage rifles, never known anyone to break one.  Known for their accuracy and ability for users to change barrels.  If you like your Savage then enjoy it and don't worry about breaking it till you break it.  Then you'll have the chance to learn how to fix it.  
I honestly don't think there is anything to this stuff people are saying about Savages not being "high round count" rifles.  I think that is nonsense!  Yes, some of the parts are stamped.  I haven't worn any of them out.  I know people who use them for target rifles.  A target gun gets more use than any hunting rifle (and probably more than most battle rifles).  If they hold up to that amount of shooting, I don't think there is a thing to worry about.
There we go! That's the way to think about it! Those guts really are pretty simple and if anything should break, I would get to know the inner workings fairly easily and be able to build a small kit of extra parts.

Who knows, maybe I'll get 10,000 rounds through this thing in the next couple of years, it'll turn out that Savage has the most rugged action out there, and that investment castings and steel stampings are the way to go.

I'll give it a try. Let's see how much time and money I can spend trying to wear out a rifle so I can spend more time and money buying another one.
« Last Edit: October 14, 2011, 09:19:13 PM by BAMB » Logged
triggertime
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« Reply #8 on: October 14, 2011, 09:53:19 PM »

There is a big differance between an investment casting and a "steel stamping"  more commenly known as "sheet metal"  MIM is another term for what I call a "POS" in most cases.  some parts are fine,  hammers, sears, thumb safety and slide lock parts are what I would call "not suitable". 

Even "Billet"  steel,  or aluminum,  is somewhat  "cast" and or massaged.  It doesn't grow on trees that way, or dug out of the ground in the dimention you want.

Best check with your rifle mfg,  and see what parts are available.  A whole bunch are "factory fitted only"  and you will have to send the rifle to them for fitting.     Good luck with that.

Regards,
Mark
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BAMB
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« Reply #9 on: October 15, 2011, 05:52:19 AM »

I didn't mean to equate sheet metal and investment castings. I'm just sayin both are contained within the Savage.

Anyway, you are absoulutely right about all of that. I may end up having to send the rifle back to Savage quite often if I try to break the damn thing. I guess that would not be any fun, and I would not learn how to fix anything.

But, whatever, we'll see what happens. If it breaks too easily, that'll give me a great excuse to build a scout rifle from one of those Ruger or Winchester actions, right?

Plus: that one willl be invinvible!
 
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michaelb
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« Reply #10 on: October 15, 2011, 01:17:14 PM »

I only own one of their products but last I checked CZ bolt action rifles were still made of milled steel forgings.  They have a reputation for being "strong like tractor." 
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"The object of the practical rifleman is the achievement of first-round hits, on appropriate targets, at unknown ranges, from improvised firing positions, against the clock." - Jeff Cooper, The Art of the Rifle
F224
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« Reply #11 on: October 15, 2011, 07:21:45 PM »

The Blaser rifles have always interested me, but I've never seen one that I could touch (I've only seen them in photos, on TV  and on the internet).  Where can they be bought, and how much do they cost?  They strike me as an interesting piece of technology, but overly engineered and probably delicate.  Obviously that is only an impression because I've never shot or even held one, so I could be completely wrong.

Several European military's use the LRS and Tact II series of rifles, and having hunted with them from -20F to +108F and from ice to extreme dust and sand, I can assure you they are not delicate.

Much more compact than any other bolt action, Col. Cooper heaped heavy praise upon them in both print and spoken word.

I have five of the bolt guns and one single shot. Except for my 204 Ruger Kimber, custom 6.8SPC Ruger MKII and my GSR Scout, they are all I use.

Check out www.BlaserPro.com for more information.
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Captain Dave Funk
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frank505
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« Reply #12 on: November 04, 2011, 12:39:16 PM »

My rifle experience in dusty, windy northwest Wyoming has been with Springfields, 1917 Enfield, Model 54 and 70 Winchester and the rifle I use most is a REmington 700 HPSR. Have had zero failures with all of them. I look at the blaser and cant help but wonder what it would do after a week or so riding around on a 4 wheeler, jeep dash etc. with lots of dust blowing. Hmmmmmmmmmmm
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Whelenshooter
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« Reply #13 on: November 04, 2011, 12:55:24 PM »

I think if I was going to have a Blaser, I'd want to have two, or at least have another back-up rifle.  My guess is if you did manage to break one it would take close to a year to get it fixed.

Whelenshooter
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Hawk
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« Reply #14 on: January 19, 2012, 02:15:44 PM »

I have a Remington 700 that I had the barrel cut down to 16 in. and put a scout scope on. Pretty light so it has kick, but I've killed a lot of deer with it over the years. For the price, which was small, its the best rifle I've ever had. Although I really like to get close as possible, I've made a 200 yd shot with it on a whitetail. It works from a stand or stalking. I have made quite a few running shots up to 50 yds. I have a Leupold Scout Scope with a German Number 1 Reticle. I really like the Remington 700 as a base for a Scout.
Hawk
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